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Reading: Impact of agricultural land use on soil organic carbon sequestration at sub-catchment scale

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Impact of agricultural land use on soil organic carbon sequestration at sub-catchment scale

Authors:

D. D. A. E. Hemamali,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About D. D. A. E.
Postgraduate Institute of Agriculture
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U. W. A. Vitharana ,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About U. W. A.
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture
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B. L. W. K. Balasooriya,

Wayamba University of Sri Lanka, Kuliyapitiya, LK
About B. L. W. K.
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture and Plantation Management
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C. P. Attanayake,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About C. P.
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture
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W. S. Dandeniya,

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About W. S.
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture
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S. I. Nimanthi

University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, LK
About S. I.
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture
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Abstract

Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool determines the potential of soil to perform ecosystem services and maintain climatic stability. Land use plays a significant role in determining the carbon (C) sequestration in soil. This study aimed to determine the impact of long-term agricultural land uses on SOC and other physico-chemical properties and to determine interrelationships between SOC stock and topographic variables at sub-catchment scale in upcountry of Sri Lanka. Soil samples were collected from surface (0-30 cm) and subsurface (30-60 cm) at 109 locations from vegetable (n = 42), tea (n = 44) and forest (n = 23) land uses in a sub-catchment (360 ha) in Nuwara Eliya. Average SOC in different land uses were compared by analysis of variance followed by Tukey post-hoc mean comparison. The largest surface SOC stock was observed in forested area (71.8 Mg/ha) followed by vegetable lands (61.8 Mg/ha) and it was significantly lesser in tea lands (50.7 Mg/ha). The forest soils showed the largest subsurface SOC stock (67.1 t/ha) as well, followed by tea (64.8 Mg/ha) and vegetable (57.9 Mg/ha) land uses. No significant relationship was observed between SOC stock and topographic variables, namely elevation, slope, wetness index and stream power index. This study concludes that the land use is a key determinant of the spatial heterogeneity of SOC and forest have the greater ability of sequestering C compared to vegetable and tea land uses in the studied sub-catchment area.

How to Cite: Hemamali, D.D.A.E., Vitharana, U.W.A., Balasooriya, B.L.W.K., Attanayake, C.P., Dandeniya, W.S. and Nimanthi, S.I., 2020. Impact of agricultural land use on soil organic carbon sequestration at sub-catchment scale. Tropical Agricultural Research, 31(1), pp.13–20. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/tar.v31i1.8340
Published on 01 Jan 2020.
Peer Reviewed

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