Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: The Pattern of Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables by Undergraduate Students: A Case Study

Download

A- A+
dyslexia friendly

Research Articles

The Pattern of Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables by Undergraduate Students: A Case Study

Authors:

T Perera,

Postgraduate Institute of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, LK
X close

T Madhujith

Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya,, LK
X close

Abstract

Dietary patterns rich in high fruits and vegetables intake are associated with  a myriad of health benefits. Dietary habits of young adults is in limelight, as this group is in  transition from adolescence to adulthood and are potential to influence the health status of  next generation. The purpose of this study was to explore the fruit and vegetable  consumption behavior of undergraduate students of the University of Peradeniya. The  specific objectives were to (i) identify the fruit  and vegetable consumption pattern of the  cohort (ii) identify the knowledge and attitudes of students over fruit and vegetable  consumption as perceived facilitators and barriers, and (iii) establish relationships among  different factors influencing fruit and vegetable consumption pattern of undergraduate  students. The study was carried out with 90 students from the Faculties of Agriculture,  Medicine and Engineering. Respondents were instructed to indicate the frequency and  portion size representing their usual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Data were  analyzed using probit analysis to identify the factors affecting dietary consumption of fruits  and vegetables. It was observed that the most frequently consumed fruits by the study cohort  were banana, papaya, mango, orange and pineapple and the vegetables were beans, dhal,  carrot, potato, leeks, pumpkin, Gotukola and Mukunuwenna. The mean fruit and vegetable  consumption per day was 267 g which is far less than the recommended quantity for the  particular age group. Regression results revealed that the faculty, religion and the academic  year did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the recommended intake. However, gender, income,  taboos and knowledge score have shown significant effect on fruit and vegetable  consumption among undergraduate students tested. Further, it was revealed that a high  proportion of the students were unaware of the health benefits of consumption of fruits and  vegetables.

Tropical Agricultural Research Vol. 23 (3): 261-271 (2012)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4038/tar.v23i3.4663
How to Cite: Perera, T. & Madhujith, T., (2012). The Pattern of Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables by Undergraduate Students: A Case Study. Tropical Agricultural Research. 23(3), pp.261–271. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/tar.v23i3.4663
Published on 19 Sep 2012.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus